Directions to programs

Upcoming Eastern Sierra Audubon Programs

When: Normally on the FIRST Wednesdays (unless otherwise noted) of October, December, February, and April; 7:00 PM (see Events Calendar) and sometimes additional months.
Where: Venues vary - in the past we've held programs at the White Mountain Research Center, Owens Valley Station (4 mi. East of Bishop on East Line St., see Map, or the USFS/BLM Office Meeting Room in Bishop (see Map) - See program details for information and updates.

Evening programs will be preceded by (1) announcements of interest to the membership, and (2) sharing of recent bird sightings and other news on the local natural history scene. Check back here or local news media for possible changes. Everyone is welcome to attend!


ESAS Evening Program:

April 12: Ripple Effects - using sound to study the effects of introduced trout on bird populations around alpine lakes, with Mary Clapp

Mountain Bluebird, with food, photo by Gail Patricelli

Mountain Bluebird, with food, photo by Gail Patricelli

Wednesday, April 12, 2017, U.S. Forest Service/BLM Building in Bishop, 7:00pm

Our April program will be held at the U.S. Forest Service/BLM Building in Bishop on West Line Street, near the DMV. Doors open at 6:30, with the presentation starting at 7:00pm.

Guest speaker, Mary Clapp, will discuss her ongoing research on the impacts of introduced trout on the native bird community in the high-elevation lake basins of Sequoia-Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI). Non-native trout prey heavily upon aquatic insects, potentially outcompeting native insectivores (including birds and bats) for an important food source and altering their foraging behavior, fitness, and reproductive success in unknown ways. Her work studies this connection between water and land by using acoustic recorders to remotely capture lakeside activity by birds and bats, and comparing this technology with traditional survey methods. In this talk, she will give a brief overview of the acoustic methods she has used to compare bird activity at fish-containing and fishless lakesides and review preliminary analyses. Her work is made possible by substantial collaboration with SEKI and the Natural Sounds and Night Skies Division of the National Park Service.

Mary Clapp is currently a fourth-year Ph.D. student in the Graduate Group in Ecology at UC Davis. Though native to Maryland, she migrated to the wilderness of the Sierra Nevada in 2010, where her academic imagination took flight and where she has continued to naturalize. When she is not in the alpine zone eavesdropping on birds and bats, she can be found at lower elevations exploring riparian corridors, cliffsides, boulder fields, and hot springs (or at her computer in Davis).

Questions/comments: programs@esaudubon.org; For more information contact Erin Nordin (email erin@esaudubon.org). Also, check back to the programs page for updates to the list of future speakers. Everyone is welcome to attend all programs!


Everyone is welcome to attend all programs!

If you have any questions or are interested in presenting a program, please contact our programs coordinator at: programs@esaudubon.org.

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